Monday, October 22, 2007

Scottish Vocabulary

I'm sure there will be many more additions to this list as time goes by and we learn more words.

Rubbish: trash, also used as an adjective, "the weather today is rubbish."

Bin: trash can

Boot: trunk of a car

Lorry: large commercial truck; like a tractor trailer, but smaller

Crisps: potato chips

Chips: french fries

Trolley: shopping cart

Mobile: cell phone

Keen: same definition as what we know, but it's used all the time. "He's very keen on going to the football game."

Football: actually means soccer

Pants: girls underwear

Trousers: the proper word for the things you put on your legs

Chancer: a slang word said about someone who's being sneaky, conniving, rude, etc.

Make Tracks: used often when someone is saying they need to leave, "I'm going to have to make tracks now, it's getting late."

Car Park: parking lot.

6 comments:

Andrea said...

Have you come to a round-about yet?

Laughing to myself about the meaning of pants. Boy I could see you all getting into all sort of trouble with that one.

James to his new friends: "I gotta go buy some pants.". Teeheehee

andi said...

I love these little differences! When I was in London my hostmom always asked "Are you alright?" and I wondered if I really looked that bad all the time, but it turns out that just meant "how are you?"

Valerie said...

I just looked at the weather in Dornoch and it said it was ll degrees , but I forgot it was in Celsius and I almost started crying for you.

Anonymous said...

Jenn,
Next time we go to the Front Porch Restaurant at Seneca Rocks, WV. I will get an extra placemat. Your new friends in Scotland may want to learn some new Southern/West Virginia verbage.....and I didn't say garbage. Don't forget "hoot" is not just what an owl says...ask Timon, he knows. Oh yes his new favorite is in reference to my dads old "Fox" shotgun.."it will kick the living daylights out of you". Oh yeah, I had a deer jump out in front of me this morning and I had to "slam on brakes" to keep from hitting him.
Love dad

Anonymous said...

Jennifer.....
You'll have to let the Scots know that some Americans used the phrase "make tracks" back in Civil War times. In "Gone with the Wind," when one of the male slaves rescues Scarlet O'Hara after she's been attacked, he gets her in the wagon and says, "hoss (horse)make tracks!"

What I really want to know is have you tried some hagas yet??

Love reading all your posts!!
~Melanie

scotbhoy79 said...

Oi ther sonny jim i no what am clyping aboot, so wheesht! an lippen to what ah have to say, an you are speaking a feck of footer you unco eejit. So her is a list of ye old scottish banter.

a hantle o' = a number of ?
abune = above
aiblins = perhaps
airn = iron (Nor. jern)
airt = quarter, direction
aith = oath (Nor. 'ed ')
aits = oats
ane = ain, own, one
aucht = eighth
auld = old
back-cast = setback ?
barley kail = kail, greens, broth
bauchle = shoe
baulk = stand back from, won¹t face up to
bawbee = money, coin (old Scots = 6 pence)
beal = fester
begowked = (stymied?)
bent = grass bield (as in bield of the trees) = shelter
bielded = sheltered
bien = ?
bien doun-setting = good establishment ?
biggit = built (Nor/. 'bygget)
bit = nick of time, timeous
black-avised = ?
blate = bashful
blaw = blow (Nor. blåse)
blithe = glad (Nor. blid)
bogles = demons, goblins
bolls = (measure of corn?)
boskage = (Fr.bocage ?)
braid = broad
brandering = (roasting?)
braw = brave, fine, handsome
braw time = good time
breeks = trousers
brig = bridge
brock = badger
browst (of yill) = mischief, brew
bruit of it = (noise of it?)
buirdly chiel = ?
buts-and-bens = buts = kitchen, bens = room
byke = wasp's nest, crowd
caddis-worm = (glowworm??)
caller = cool, fresh
callout = ?
camsteery lad = ?
cantrip = spree?
canty = cheerful, jolly
carls = old men (Nor. Karl)
cartes = playing cards caterans = kind of folk
cauld = cold (Nor. kalt)
certes = for sure
change-houses = ale houses, pubs
chief = friendly
chirugeon = surgeon (Nor. kirurg)
chuckie o' tipyet = mother hen of 'young'
clachan = hamlet
clamgamphried = made nonsense of
clamjamphrie = rubbish, nonsense, rabble
clary = ?
clatter-vengeance = revengeful talk?
clavers (old wives' clavers) = tales
cleading = clothing (Nor. kleder)
cleus = ?
clouts = bandages (Nor. klut = cloth)

clypes = telling tales (already told in confidence)
clyping with = chattering with
cockaree = person
chocket on a grossart =choking on a berry
colloque = confer
coup = (coups the crans) upset, knock over
couthy = loving, kindly
cowes =goblins, demons
cracks = talks, conversations
craig = crag
crans = tripods for cooking pots
craw = crow (Nor. kråke)
creel = basket
creepie = stool, chair, settle?
crouse = cocksure
crow a pyke = pick a bone
crusie = lamp/candle? cupples = beans ?
cushats = cushant = wood pigeon
cutty-stool = stool of repentence (church)
daffin' = fooling about, flirting
dang down = overcame, did down (Nor. deng = bash)
daunder = stroll
deas = (as in 'turf deas')
deave with = unbearable noises - deafen
deid thraws = death throes
delations = deletions, removals
denty = ?
ding (out ) = knock (out) (Nor. deng = bash)
dirl = shake (Nor. 'dirre')
dirlin' = rattling
dittay = reproof, ground of indictment
divot = piece of turf
doer = man of business
doit = small coin (Nor. døyt = trifle)
doited = to be crazed, enfeebled, bemused
dook = duck (as to duck someone)
doomster = hangman
doorcheeks = cheek = side piece
doorstraw = door stone?
dorts = sulks
douce = sedate, sober
doucer = more docile?
dowie job = dowie = gloomy, sad
downsetting = a settling down
dowp = (body part)
dredgies = funeral feast
dreich = dreary
drumly = muddy
duds = old clothes
dwaibly = ?
dwam = swoon/ unconsciousness dwine = ?
een = eyes (Nor. øyne)
eident = careful
eidently = prudently?
elbuck = elbow
engage = confirm
ensample = example
ettle (verb) = aim, purpoes (noun)
ettles = plural
ettling = intending ?
fand = found (Nor. fant)
fash = bother
fashious way = tricky, awkward
fause = false
fechting = fighting, quarrelling (Nor. fekting = fencing)
feck o' = ?
ferlies = marvels
fernitickles = freckles
fickles = puzzles
fleyed = frightened
fleyed out 'o the shiels = ?
floorish & nesty green busses = buss = bush
flyte on = scold (fly at)
flyting = scolding
foumarts = polecats
fower-room = ?
frae that airt = from that direction/place?
freit = omen
fremd = foreign (Nor. fremmed)
froth on the pat ='head' on a beer (tankard)
fuff (noun) = puff of smoke
fushion = melting
gait = walk (a gait from a to b)
gant = yawn gar (verb) = make, cause or compel
gardee (verb) = to put down ?
garred = forced
garrons = horses
gash = ghastly
gaun = going
gey gash = shrewd, witty
gey goods = ?
gillyflowers = ?
gilpie = young woman
girnel = (house? building? meal container?)
glebe = portion of land
gleed = squinting
gleg =sharp, smart (Nor. 'gløgg')
glegg as a maukin = smart as a hare
glisk of = glimpse of
gowk = dolt, fool
graip = fork (Nor. greip)
granin' = crying (Nor. grining)
grieve = farm manager (Nor. greve = count)
grippy =?
grosarts = gooseberries?
grue= grave (as in cauld grue)
guddle trout = tickle trout
guisyard = ?
gyte = deranged, daft?
hadden down = smitten by ?
haill = whole (Nor. hel)
hairst = harvest (Nor. autumn = høst)
hankin' = snagging
hantl = (collection?)
hauds to himself = keeps or holds to himself haughs = river plains
haverel = halfwit, simpleton
havers = tales
hellicat = shrew
hirpling = limping, hobbling
hirsel = (hissel = flock of sheep)
hoast = cough (Nor. host)
hoastin' = coughing (Nor. hoste)
homologate = agree /endorse previous action
hooghed his shelty = ?
hoots, toots =
hotching = jerking, twitching
howdie = midwife
howes = howes
howkit out = dragged out, extracted
howns = (fields?)
hyperion of bourtree & rue = medicine
ilka = every, any
incomer = one from outside
ingeminating = repeating
inraxed = unstretched
islaff of = a touch of (eg. the sun)
jaloused = guessed
jauds = portions
jaw = throw, pour
jimp = scarcely
joe = sweetheart
jowk = dodge, duck, evade
kail = cabbage (Nor. kål)
kail-runt = cabbage stalk
kain meal = tax?
kebbuck = a cheese
keekit out = peered out (Nor. kikke ut)
kenna = know (Nor. kjenne)
kenspeckle = conspicuous
kerns = soldiers/troops/ fellows ? kimmer = gossip
kirkton = church
kirn-milk = (Nor. kjern = a churn for making butter)
kittle = excite, tickle, tune-up
kittled = tickled
knowes= knolls
kyn = cattle
laigh = low
lameter (noun) = ?
lauch at = laugh at
lave = others/(the) rest
leal-hearted = loyal, true
lees = ?
lichtit = lighted
limmer = scoundrel, jade, whore
linns = waterfalls
linsey-wolsey = linen wool
lippen = listen
loan = lane
louping = leaping, jumping (Nor. løping)
loupit like the lave = jumped like the rest
lowe (noun) = flame, blaze
lown downsetting = ?
lown = mild (as of weather)
lugs = ears
lum = chimney
mailin' = small-holding, farm (mailin)
marmoreal =
marrow = mate
maud = plaid (man's garment)
maukin = hare
maun ye?= must you (Nor. må De)
maut = malt, barley
mealark = ?
mense or sense = tact, good manners
messam = messan = cur, lapdog messan duz = ?
michty = mighty
mimmou' = affectedly modest
mooles = (mool = earth, clod, grave)
muckle = much, many (Swedish = mykke)
muir fowl = moor grouse
mutchkin = quarter Scots pint (measure)
naut = ?
neb = nose (Nor. nebb)
neist = next to (Nor. neste ?)
nettie wives = ?
nievefu' = fistful (Nor. neve full)
niffer = bargain
nowt & wedders = ?
nutriment = nourishment
ongaein = goings on ?
ouercome = overcome
ower puir = overly pure
oxter = armpit
oy = grandson
paiks = punishment/desserts
pawky (pawky bodies) = pauky = cunning, sly
peesweeps = birds
phylacteris = (type of medicine?)
placks, doits, bodles = old coins
plashing bog = wet bog
plenishing = (supplies?)
plew = plough
pow (wags his pow) = head
preen = pin
press = cupboard
press-bed = cupboard or alcove beds
prickers = ?
prie = try or taste
prie = try
printit lear = printed learning, lore puddock = frog or toad
pyets = magpies
ran-dan = rangling (Nor. å rangle)
randan =
randies = ?
rax your legs = stretch
recusancy = refusal
redd up = clear up (Nor. rydde opp)
redd (verb) = right/save (Nor. å redde)
redder's straik = the peacemakers blow
reddings = ?
rede = advise (Nor. råd)
reek = smoke
rickle (mere rickle of bones)= pile of sheaves (corn)
riddled it out = figured it out
rig = ?
ripe (verb) = ?
roupit = roupet = husky, hoarse
rowk = fog (Nor. røyk = smoke)
rudas wives = ?
run like jukes =
saft een = saft = soft, silly
saft = soft, silly, lax
sair = sore, very - satisfy
sair tuilzie = (sour ?)
sark = shirt?
sarkfo' = sachful
saugh = willow
saut = salt
scaith = ?
scart (with a pen) = stroke?, signature?
scaurs = scars
screed = tear, rattle off
scunner = take a dislike to
sea-maw = coastal bay?
sectaries & antinomians = secretaries? & ?
seisun of = knowledge of?
shaws = woods
sheiling = cottage shilpit = ?
siccan = such an (Nor. 'slik en'?)
siccar = sure (Nor. 'sikkert')
skailed = spilled, poured?
skellies = squints
skellochs = yells?
skilly = skilled ?
smeddum = dust, fine powder
smoor (verb) = to smother
snaw = snow (Nor. snø)
sned them = lop off, prune
snell = keen, bitter wind
snowk up = breath in (Nor. snork = snore)
sodgers = soldiers
sowens = sour pudding (oats and water)
speel a tree = climb
spleuchan = tobacco pouch (scrotum, vagina)
staunchtit oot = stretched out?
steekit doors = shut, (barred/locked) doors?
stench lees = ?
stound = thrill of pleasure
stoup (take a stoup) = tankard, measure
stour = dust
straucht = straight (?Nor. strak)
stravaiging = wandering (Nor. streife)
straw (verb) = sicken (one)?
strawsome = ?
swatch o' = sample
sweir = hard (Nor. svær)
syne = ago, since
tack = lease, tenure
take tent of = take note of
targes & spears = targets & shields/spears
teetotom = spinning top?
temd = fealty
tent = heed, care
teugh = tough, hardy
the bejaunts = ?
the feck of = the whole of the get of = the way of
thirled = pierced, penetrated
thole = tolerate, endure
thrang = busy, crowd, jostle (eg.thrang body)
thrang , the Deil's = devil of a crowd
thrapple = throat
thrawn heids = unshaken, unchangeable heads (opinion)
thraws = pangs, throes
threshes = thrashes, flails
thrissels = thistles
tirrivee = generally upset (various causes)
to lowse = to loose
to speir = to ask (Nor. spør)
tod = fox
toom = empty (Nor. tom)
tramash = confusion, likened to tirrivee
traunched by = ?
trokings = dealings (troke = to barter)
tykes = dogs, mongrels, curs
unco = strange
usquebaugh = whisky (Burns = usquabae)
wabster = weaver
wale = pick, choice, select
wame = belly, womb (Nor. vom = belly, gut)
wan = won (Nor. vant = won)
wanchancy thing = dangerous, unlucky
wastry = extravagance, wastefulness
wauf = feeble
waukrife = wakeful, vigilant
weans = children, infants
wedder = sheep?
wergh = ?
wershland = sour land, rank soil
whaup = curlew wheen = many
whilk = which
whinstone screes =
whittle at the King's perogative = reduce it? whittle = knife
widdershins = anticlockwise
windy = window (Nor. vindu )
wirriecowgin =
wuddy = hangman's rope
wysed = deceived
wyte = blame
yestreen = yesterday
yett = gate
yill = ale (as of beer?)
yirth = earth